April 6, 2018 • Cee • Reviews

Pacifica by Kristen Simmons • March 6, 2018 • Tor Teen
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Marin is cosario royalty, a pirate like her father and his father before him. Sailing the ocean to chase adventure is in her blood. But these days no one cares that the island town her people call home is named after her grandfather. They have a new leader, one who promises an end to their hunger – and one who thinks that girls are meant for the kitchen or the brothel. Marin knows she’s meant for more than that, and with the sudden influx of weapons on the island, and rumors of a pending deal with the enemy oil nation in her wake, she knows a big score to gain the council’s favor is the only way to save her people, and herself.

Ross lives a life of privilege. As the president’s son he wants for nothing, but he longs for a life of adventure. On a dare, he convinces his best friend Adam to sneak out to the Docks, the site of local race riots between the poor Shorlings and the upper class. But when Adam is arrested along with the other Shorlings, and not even the president is willing to find him, Ross finds himself taking matters into his own hands. He journeys back into the Docks, ready to make deals with anyone, even a beautiful pirate, if it means Adam’s safe return.

When Marin and Ross meet in dangerous Shoreling territory he sees a way to get his friend back and she sees her ticket home. The ransom a president’s son would command could feed her people for years and restore her family’s legacy. But somewhere in the middle of the ocean, Marin must decide if her heart can handle handing over the only person who has ever seen her as more than a pirate.

myreview

I received this book for free from Wunderkind PR & Tor Teen for review consideration. This does not affect my opinion of the book or the content of my review.

First sentence: “When Marin was twelve years old, her father told her two things.”

What could bring a pirate’s daughter and the president’s son together? 

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April 4, 2018 • Cee • Discussion

Keep ’em short, and I’ll hit my reading goals.

For those who do not know, Too Much TBR is a way to help me see which books I really need to read and tackle them. Is it effective? Perhaps. It helps a lot seeing a visual of the books on my TBR pile.

Let’s discuss what I read last month, and what I’m reading this month!

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April 2, 2018 • Cee • Discussion

You ever want to know what people are buying in bookstores? Well, it so happens that I work at one!

During the last week of February, I pondered about what type of post to make for “Books in Hand.” At first, I planned to discuss all the books customers came in asking for or buying, but that’s a bit too much because everybody came in asking for different books, and I didn’t remember all of them. My boss showed me a way to check our store’s bestsellers—in the past seven days or the past four weeks.

And that’s what this post is—seeing the top ten selling books of March. Let’s take a look.

FICTION

The Alchemist by Paulo Coelho | Annihilation by Jeff Vandermeer | Ready Player One by Ernest Cline |
Call Me By Your Name by André Aciman | Pachinko by Min Jin Lee

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March 30, 2018 • Cee • Reviews

Bygone Badass Broads by Mackenzi Lee • February 27, 2018 • ABRAMS Image
Website | TwitterGoodreads | Amazon | Barnes & NobleThe Book Depository | Indigo | Library

Based on Mackenzi Lee’s popular weekly Twitter series of the same name, Bygone Badass Broads features 52 remarkable and forgotten trailblazing women from all over the world.

With tales of heroism and cunning, in-depth bios and witty storytelling, Bygone Badass Broads gives new life to these historic female pioneers. Starting in the fifth century BC and continuing to the present, the book takes a closer look at bold and inspiring women who dared to step outside the traditional gender roles of their time. Coupled with riveting illustrations and Lee’s humorous and conversational storytelling style, this book is an outright celebration of the badass women who paved the way for the rest of us.

myreview

I received this book for free from ABRAMS for review consideration. This does not affect my opinion of the book or the content of my review.

First sentence: “The story of Empress Xi Ling Shi is so wrapped up in legend it’s hard to know what’s real and what’s mythology. “

Attention, it’s the start of the history class you’ve always wanted: what women did throughout history that we should know about.

If you’ve seen Mackenzi Lee’s Twitter threads about different badass and diverse women in history, those threads have been expanded into this book, Bygone Badass Broads. This book introduces readers to 52 inspiring and innovative women who have been forgotten by history—familiar ones like Lorraine Hansberry and Noor Inayat Khan to not-known-ones like Friederike Mandelbaum and Kumander Liwaymay (and when I think about it, all the ladies Mackenzi picked to write about are very unknown to most of us). And let me say, Bygone Badass Broads should be a must-read for every human being and creature on this Earth (and maybe in outer space, who knows).

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March 27, 2018 • Cee • Comics

from panel to panel

I love comics and graphic novels, so what do I do with that love? Well, I turn it into a new feature!

From Panel to Panel is a new feature where I talk about the awesome (and perhaps not-so awesome) comic books and graphic novels I’ve read. Basically, this will be me pushing them onto your laps. You’re welcome.

I can’t even describe March’s graphic novels because they’re stories of women throughout history, a librarian working at a haunted museum, charming romances, unlikely team-ups, and many more. This month, you need to put these on your TBR list.

Get your shopping carts loaded with all these comics!

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March 25, 2018 • Cee • Discussion

 Like many of you, I’ve put many books on my TBR list because I was planning to read them once upon a time ago, but that simply didn’t happen. I’ve looked at my list from Goodreads a couple of days ago, and realized that I had no desire to read some of the books I put on my TBR list because of x-y-z reason (which includes the story no longer pertains to what I enjoy reading about, I’ve heard so much about the book that it has become overhyped, and just because).

The books are the list are ones I put years ago when I started blogging (so that’s like six years ago). It’s time for me to let go of these books because I don’t think I’ll ever get to it.

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