September 10, 2017 • Cee • Reviews

Girls Made of Snow and Glass by Melissa Bashardoust • September 5, 2017 • Flatiron Books (Macmillan)
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At sixteen, Mina’s mother is dead, her magician father is vicious, and her silent heart has never beat with love for anyone—has never beat at all, in fact, but she’d always thought that fact normal. She never guessed that her father cut out her heart and replaced it with one of glass. When she moves to Whitespring Castle and sees its king for the first time, Mina forms a plan: win the king’s heart with her beauty, become queen, and finally know love. The only catch is that she’ll have to become a stepmother.

Fifteen-year-old Lynet looks just like her late mother, and one day she discovers why: a magician created her out of snow in the dead queen’s image, at her father’s order. But despite being the dead queen made flesh, Lynet would rather be like her fierce and regal stepmother, Mina. She gets her wish when her father makes Lynet queen of the southern territories, displacing Mina. Now Mina is starting to look at Lynet with something like hatred, and Lynet must decide what to do—and who to be—to win back the only mother she’s ever known…or else defeat her once and for all.

Entwining the stories of both Lynet and Mina in the past and present, Girls Made of Snow and Glass traces the relationship of two young women doomed to be rivals from the start. Only one can win all, while the other must lose everything—unless both can find a way to reshape themselves and their story.

myreview

I received this book for free from Macmillan for review consideration. This does not affect my opinion of the book or the content of my review.

First sentence: “Lynet first saw her in the courtyard.”

Mirror, mirror on the wall, who’s the fairest—let me stop there because Girls Made of Snow and Glass is not that fairytale. Generally, with fairytales, there’s always an evil queen or witch or stepmother who makes the main character’s life a living hell, but that is not the case for this book. Girls Made of Snow and Glass doesn’t follow those fairytales.

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September 8, 2017 • Cee • Discussion

August was ARC August. September is not, but it’s another month of trying to catch up with my review copies TBR list. Whoo hoo.

For those who do not know, Too Much TBR is a way to help me see which books I really need to read and tackle them. It helps a lot seeing a visual of the books on my TBR pile.

Let’s discuss what I read last month, and what I’m reading this month!

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September 6, 2017 • Cee • Comics

All’s Faire in Middle School by Victoria Jamieson • September 5, 2017 • Dial Books (Penguin)
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Eleven-year-old Imogene (Impy) has grown up with two parents working at the Renaissance Faire, and she’s eager to begin her own training as a squire. First, though, she’ll need to prove her bravery. Luckily Impy has just the quest in mind–she’ll go to public school after a life of being homeschooled! But it’s not easy to act like a noble knight-in-training in middle school. Impy falls in with a group of girls who seem really nice (until they don’t) and starts to be embarrassed of her thrift shop apparel, her family’s unusual lifestyle, and their small, messy apartment. Impy has always thought of herself as a heroic knight, but when she does something really mean in order to fit in, she begins to wonder whether she might be more of a dragon after all.

myreview

I received this book for free from Penguin for review consideration. This does not affect my opinion of the book or the content of my review.

First sentence: “Our story begins here…at the beginning.”

Never been to a Renaissance Faire? Impy (aka Imogene) and her family will welcome you with opened arms. You’re in for quite a treat. The Renaissance Faire is a delightful place where you will see the most interesting sights—both in people (who are all dressed up) and activities—and encounter out of this world things. You’ll find people speaking in olden day speech and jousting and whatnot. This is the place that Impy, the main character of All’s Faire in Middle School, loves in the entire world.

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September 2, 2017 • Cee • Discussion

The annual ARC August is finally here! It’s the fifth year. (Holy shit.) Hosted by Octavia and Shelly of Read. Sleep. Repeat, ARC August is an event that helps readers and bloggers get their ARC pile down. The rules are simply:

  • You read how many ARCS you want. YOU get to decide.
  • The book must be an ARC—physical or electronic. The ARC can be old or new ones. As long as it’s an arc, it’s okay.
  • No blog necessary to participate, but you’ll need to include some form of social media as part of your sign up.
  • Use the #ARCAugust on social media to check-in.
  • Have fun!

I urge you to sign up over here, especially if you have ARCs you need to read!

ARC August has come to an end, and was it a success or a dud?

 

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August 31, 2017 • Cee • Monthly Recap

August had its ups and its down. This month was especially hard since it was the anniversary of my dad’s passing, and we had to deal with a bunch of other annoying things that happened. I wish to have a solidly good month.

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August 31, 2017 • Cee • Comics

Like a bolt from the blue, Jack’s little sister Maddy is gone―carried into another realm by an ogre.

When Jack and Lilly follow Maddy’s captor through the portal, they are ready for anything . . . except what they find waiting for them in the floating crossroads between worlds. Even the power of their magic plants may not be enough to get them back to earth alive.

Alone and injured, Jack and Lilly must each face their own monsters―as well as giants who grind the bones of human children to feed their “beast” and a fearsome goblin king in the sewers down below.

But when Jack finds himself in a tough spot, help comes from the most unlikely person: the goblin king!

Ben Hatke, the #1 New York Times–bestselling author of Zita the Spacegirl, concludes his latest middle-grade fantasy-adventure graphic novel series, Mighty Jack, with the energetic finale to his retelling of Jack and the Beanstalk.

Once upon a time, there lived a boy named Jack with his mother and his autistic little sister Maddy. One day, Jack trades his family’s car for a box of magical seeds and discovers these magic seeds grow an entire garden of plants that have hands and legs and are ready to attack. When a portal opens up and an ogre carry Maddy away into their world, it is up to Jack and their new friend Lilly to save her! (To read up on what happens before Mighty Jack and the Goblin King, go read Mighty Jack.)

In this conclusion of a modern reimagination of Jack and the Beanstalk, Jack and Lilly will have to face their own monsters—giants and a goblin king—before they can save Maddy.

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