Archive for November, 2018

 

November 12, 2018 • Cee • Discussion

You ever want to know what people are buying in bookstores? Well, it so happens that I work at one!

During the last week of February, I pondered about what type of post to make for “Books in Hand.” At first, I planned to discuss all the books customers came in asking for or buying, but that’s a bit too much because everybody came in asking for different books, and I didn’t remember all of them. My boss showed me a way to check our store’s best selling books, and I found out what we sold a lot of!

And that’s what this post is—seeing the top ten selling books of May. Let’s take a look.

FICTION

Crazy Rich Asians by Kevin Kwan | China Rich Girlfriend by Kevin Kwan | The Reckoning by John GrishamAmericanah by Chimamanda Ngozi AdichieThe Alchemist by Paulo Coelho

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November 7, 2018 • Cee • Discussion

Too Much TBR has been on hold for a few months, but now is the time to bring it back! I’ve been caught up with work that The Novel Hermit and reading has been put on the back burner. No more! Let’s see all those books I’ll

For those who do not know, Too Much TBR is a way to help me see which books I really need to read and tackle them. It helps a lot seeing a visual of the books on my TBR pile.

Let’s discuss what I read last month, and what I’m reading this month!

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November 5, 2018 • Cee • Reviews

(Don’t) Call Me Crazy: 33 Voices Start the Conversation about Mental Health edited by Kelly Jensen • October 4, 2018 • Algonquin Young Readers
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Who’s Crazy?

What does it mean to be crazy? Is using the word crazy offensive? What happens when such a label gets attached to your everyday experiences?

In order to understand mental health, we need to talk openly about it. Because there’s no single definition of crazy, there’s no single experience that embodies it, and the word itself means different things—wild? extreme? disturbed? passionate?—to different people.

(Don’t) Call Me Crazy is a conversation starter and guide to better understanding how our mental health affects us every day. Thirty-three writers, athletes, and artists offer essays, lists, comics, and illustrations that explore their personal experiences with mental illness, how we do and do not talk about mental health, help for better understanding how every person’s brain is wired differently, and what, exactly, might make someone crazy.

If you’ve ever struggled with your mental health, or know someone who has, come on in, turn the pages, and let’s get talking.

myreview

I received this book for free from Algonquin Young Readers for review consideration. This does not affect my opinion of the book or the content of my review.

First sentence: “We all have thoughts, feelings, and internal struggles.”

I needed a book like (Don’t) Call Me Crazy when I was a teenager.

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