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October 20, 2017 • Cee • Reviews

13 Minutes by Sarah Pinborough • October 3, 2017 • Flatiron Books
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Natasha’s sure that her friends love her. But does that mean they didn’t try to kill her?

Natasha is the most popular girl in school. So why was she pulled out of a freezing river after being dead for thirteen minutes? She doesn’t remember how she ended up in the icy water that night, but she does know this—it wasn’t an accident, and she wasn’t suicidal.

Now Natasha’s two closest friends, who are usually her loyal sidekicks, are acting strangely. Natasha turns to Becca, the best friend she dumped years before, to help her figure out the mystery.

At first Becca isn’t sure that she even wants to help Natasha. But as she is drawn back into Natasha’s orbit, Becca starts putting the pieces together. As an outsider, Becca believes she may be the only one who can uncover the truth…which is far more twisted than she ever imagined.

myreview

I received this book for free from Flatiron Books for review consideration. This does not affect my opinion of the book or the content of my review.

First sentence: “It’s so cold, it’s so cold I can’t breathe and I panic hard in the water that is like shards of glass, and for the first time I think I might be in serious trouble.”

13 minutes. Tasha was dead for 13 minutes. When she wakes up, having almost drowned in the freezing river, what does she remember? Absolutely nothing. Was it an accident? Was it foul play? She can’t recollect what happened prior to being found in the river, but she does know that her two best friends are acting very weird around her. She enlists her ex-best friend Becca to help her get to the bottom of everything.

It’ll take more than 13 minutes for Tasha, Becca, and us to figure out what happened. Prepare for this mystery and these girls to mess with your head.

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October 18, 2017 • Cee • Reviews

That Inevitable Victorian Thing by E.K. Johnston• October 3, 2017 • Dutton Books for Young Readers (Penguin)
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Set in a near-future world where the British Empire was preserved, not by the cost of blood and theft but by effort of repatriation and promises kept, That Inevitable Victorian Thing is a novel of love, duty, and the small moments that can change people and the world.

Victoria-Margaret is the crown princess of the empire, a direct descendant of Victoria I, the queen who changed the course of history two centuries earlier. The imperial practice of genetically arranged matchmaking will soon guide Margaret into a politically advantageous marriage like her mother before her, but before she does her duty, she’ll have one summer incognito in a far corner of empire. In Toronto, she meets Helena Marcus, daughter of one of the empire’s greatest placement geneticists, and August Callaghan, the heir apparent to a powerful shipping firm currently besieged by American pirates. In a summer of high-society debutante balls, politically charged tea parties, and romantic country dances, Margaret, Helena, and August discover they share an unusual bond and maybe a one in a million chance to have what they want and to change the world in the process —just like the first Queen Victoria.

myreview

I received this book for free from Penguin for review consideration. This does not affect my opinion of the book or the content of my review.

First sentence: “Helena Marcus had not given much thought to her marriage.”

History has been rewritten. The British Empire is as strong as ever. This Inevitable Victorian Thing explores a world where everybody in the British Royal family—after Queen Victoria that is—married outside the European Royal family, creating diverse, multi-racial people that you see in the characters, and where old traditions like debutante balls and arranged marriages meet the new like genetic technology.

Welcome to the new, semi sci-fi British Empire.

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October 10, 2017 • Cee • Reviews

There’s Someone Inside Your House by Stephanie Perkins• September 26, 2017 • Dutton Books for Young Readers (Penguin)
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It’s been almost a year since Makani Young came to live with her grandmother in landlocked Nebraska, and she’s still adjusting to her new life. And still haunted by her past in Hawaii.

Then, one by one, the students of her small town high school begin to die in a series of gruesome murders, each with increasing and grotesque flair. As the terror grows closer and the hunt intensifies for the killer, Makani will be forced to confront her own dark secrets.

myreview

I received this book for free from Penguin for review consideration. This does not affect my opinion of the book or the content of my review.

First sentence: “The egg-shaped timer was on the welcome mat when she came home.”

“Do you like scary movies books?” said in Ghostface’s voice.

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September 27, 2017 • Cee • Reviews

jane unlimited

Jane, Unlimited by Kristin Cashore • September 5, 2017 • Kathy Dawson Books (Penguin)
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Jane has lived an ordinary life, raised by her aunt Magnolia—an adjunct professor and deep sea photographer. Jane counted on Magnolia to make the world feel expansive and to turn life into an adventure. But Aunt Magnolia was lost a few months ago in Antarctica on one of her expeditions.

Now, with no direction, a year out of high school, and obsessed with making umbrellas that look like her own dreams (but mostly just mourning her aunt), she is easily swept away by Kiran Thrash—a glamorous, capricious acquaintance who shows up and asks Jane to accompany her to a gala at her family’s island mansion called Tu Reviens.

Jane remembers her aunt telling her: “If anyone ever invites to you to Tu Reviens, promise me that you’ll go.” With nothing but a trunkful of umbrella parts to her name, Jane ventures out to the Thrash estate. Then her story takes a turn, or rather, five turns. What Jane doesn’t know is that Tu Reviens will offer her choices that can ultimately determine the course of her untethered life. But at Tu Reviens, every choice comes with a reward, or a price.

myreview

I received this book for free from Penguin for review consideration. This does not affect my opinion of the book or the content of my review.

First sentence: “The house on the cliff looks like a ship disappearing into fog.”

Jane, Unlimited is—how should I say—eccentric.

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September 17, 2017 • Cee • Reviews

When I Cast Your Shadow by Sarah Porter • September 12, 2017 • Tor Teen
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Dashiell Bohnacker was hell on his family while he was alive. But it’s even worse now that he’s dead…

Ruby. Haunted by her dead brother, unable to let him go, Ruby must figure out whether his nightly appearances in her dreams are the answer to her prayers—or a nightmare come true…

Everett. He’s always been jealous of his dashing older brother. Now Everett must do everything he can to save his twin sister Ruby from Dashiell’s clutches.

Dashiell. Charming, handsome, and manipulative, Dash has run afoul of some very powerful forces in the Land of the Dead. His only bargaining chips are Ruby and Everett. At stake is the very survival of the Bohnacker family, bodies and souls…

myreview

I received this book for free from Tor Teen for review consideration. This does not affect my opinion of the book or the content of my review.

First sentence: “There it is again: in the middle of the black river a pale arm sweeps up and then curves down with a splash.”

DNF @ PAGE 86 

(Though I read the last three chapters) 

Hahahahahahaha, I am just gonna accept that Sarah Porter books are not for me.

What I thought would be a riveting story about a pair of twins being haunted (and possessed) by their dead older brother turned out to be a goddamn mess.

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September 12, 2017 • Cee • Reviews

The Care and Feeding of A Black Hole by Michelle Cuevas • September 12, 2017 • Dial Books (Penguin)
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When eleven-year-old Stella Rodriguez shows up at NASA to request that her recording be included in Carl Sagan’s Golden Record, something unexpected happens: A black hole follows her home, and sets out to live in her house as a pet. The black hole swallows everything he touches, which is challenging to say the least—but also turns out to be a convenient way to get rid of those items that Stella doesn’t want around. Soon the ugly sweaters her aunt has made for her all disappear within the black hole, as does the smelly class hamster she’s taking care of, and most important, all the reminders of her dead father that are just too painful to have around.

It’s not until Stella, her younger brother, Cosmo, the family puppy, and even the bathroom tub all get swallowed up by the black hole that Stella comes to realize she has been letting her own grief consume her. And that’s not the only thing she realizes as she attempts to get back home. This is an astonishingly original and funny adventure with a great big heart.

myreview

I received this book for free from Penguin for review consideration. This does not affect my opinion of the book or the content of my review.

First sentence: “This story began on an afternoon the color of comets, with a girl dressed all in black. “

“Have you heard about the new book about anti-gravity?”

“What about it?”

“It’s impossible to put down.”

The Care and Feeding of A Black Hole isn’t about anti-gravity, but it is a book that you won’t be able to put down.

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