Tags Archive

 

April 14, 2017 • Cee • Letters

Dear Mackenzi Lee & The Gentleman’s Guide to Vice and Virtue,

An unforgettable tale of two friends on their Grand Tour of 18th-century Europe who stumble upon a magical artifact that leads them from Paris to Venice in a dangerous manhunt, fighting pirates, highwaymen, and their feelings for each other along the way.

Henry “Monty” Montague was born and bred to be a gentleman, but he was never one to be tamed. The finest boarding schools in England and the constant disapproval of his father haven’t been able to curb any of his roguish passions—not for gambling halls, late nights spent with a bottle of spirits, or waking up in the arms of women or men.

But as Monty embarks on his grand tour of Europe, his quest for a life filled with pleasure and vice is in danger of coming to an end. Not only does his father expect him to take over the family’s estate upon his return, but Monty is also nursing an impossible crush on his best friend and traveling companion, Percy.

Still it isn’t in Monty’s nature to give up. Even with his younger sister, Felicity, in tow, he vows to make this yearlong escapade one last hedonistic hurrah and flirt with Percy from Paris to Rome. But when one of Monty’s reckless decisions turns their trip abroad into a harrowing manhunt that spans across Europe, it calls into question everything he knows, including his relationship with the boy he adores.Goodreads

Read more »





September 25, 2015 • Cee • Reviews

This Monstrous Thing

This Monstrous Thing by Mackenzi Lee •  September 22, 2015 • Katherine Tegen Books (HarperCollins)
WebsiteTwitter | Goodreads | Amazon | Barnes & Noble |  The Book Depository

In 1818 Geneva, men built with clockwork parts live hidden away from society, cared for only by illegal mechanics called Shadow Boys. Two years ago, Shadow Boy Alasdair Finch’s life shattered to bits.

His brother, Oliver—dead.

His sweetheart, Mary—gone.

His chance to break free of Geneva—lost.

Heart-broken and desperate, Alasdair does the unthinkable: He brings Oliver back from the dead.

But putting back together a broken life is more difficult than mending bones and adding clockwork pieces. Oliver returns more monster than man, and Alasdair’s horror further damages the already troubled relationship.

Then comes the publication of Frankenstein and the city intensifies its search for Shadow Boys, aiming to discover the real life doctor and his monster. Alasdair finds refuge with his idol, the brilliant Dr. Geisler, who may offer him a way to escape the dangerous present and his guilt-ridden past, but at a horrible price only Oliver can pay…

myreview

I received this book for free from HarperCollins in exchange for review consideration. This does not affect my opinion of the book or the content of my review.

First sentence: “My brother’s heart was heavy in my hands.”

The first time I ever read Frankenstein was in a required British Literature course for my major, and I absolutely fell in love with the story. When I heard about This Monstrous Thing, my heart nearly leaped out of my chest because I never knew how much I wanted this book.

This Monstrous Thing takes place in 1818 Geneva, where Alasdair Finch has to deal with his guilt for his brother’s death as well as navigate the constant threats against Clockwork men (people who have clock parts as body parts) and Shadow Boys (mechanics who help them) that have been more rampant since a new book called Frankenstein was published, which seems to detail the events of the resurrection of his brother, Oliver. Not only does Alasdair have to deal these, he has to deal with Dr. Geisler, his idol, who has nefarious plans for Alasdair and his brother.

Doesn’t that sound interesting?

Read more »