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May 27, 2014 • Cee • Events

armchairbea21

BookExpo America (BEA) is the big book convention held in New York where authors, bloggers, and publishers get together and makes every book lover cry – either in joy (because they were able to attend and get to meet authors and get ARCs) or in sadness (because those who are unable to attend have prior engagements).

Since I get go to BEA, I’ve decided to take part in Armchair BEA, which is basically a virtual conference for people who cannot attend the actual convention. Let’s get this started, shall we?

TOPIC: Author Interaction

I’m not sure if this is most people, but I consider authors to be celebrities, of sorts (since they are the closest I’ll ever meet). When I meet them, I get totally tongue-tied. I feel most awkward when I can’t find the words to express how much I adore them and their writing. I want to say something witty and amazing for them to remember me, but words are hard sometimes!

Any time an author retweets or tweets at me, I jump for joy. It’s just a little thing, but I get excited because the authors are really reading my tweet! That means a lot to me.

I haven’t been to a lot of book events, but mannn, the ones I did go to were sooo much fun. I have so many favorite moments with each author I’ve seen, but I’ll share the memorable ones.

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May 26, 2014 • Cee • Events

armchairbea21

BookExpo America (BEA) is the big book convention held in New York where authors, bloggers, and publishers get together and makes every book lover cry – either in joy (because they were able to attend and get to meet authors and get ARCs) or in sadness (because those who are unable to attend have prior engagements).

Since I get go to BEA, I’ve decided to take part in Armchair BEA, which is basically a virtual conference for people who cannot attend the actual convention. Let’s get this started, shall we?

Please tell us a little bit about yourself: Who are you? How long have you been blogging? Why did you get into blogging? Where in the world are you blogging from?

I am the fabulous Cee! From the beautiful state of California! I am lover of books, fonts, design, and puns. (Well known for the latter three if you ask my friends.) I’ve been book blogging for a year and a half, but I’ve been blogging longer than that. I started blogging because I wanted to find people who share the same interests as me. My friends IRL don’t really follow the same stuff as I do (like TV shows, movies, actors/actresses, or books), so I felt pretty lonely. I needed people to fangirl with, and I found them through blogging.

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June 2, 2013 • Cee • Events

armchairbea21

Today, I’m going to try to wrap this up! What? Why? It’s the end of Armchair BEA!

It has been a fun, but busy week. Armchair BEA has managed to distract me from the actual BEA. I’m sad this had to end, but what can I do about it?

Favorites

  • Discussion topic: Being able to talk about the two favorites in childhood literature.
  • Getting blog traffic, especially for the blogger development post (which really surprised me of the amount).
  • Being able to write an entry quickly. I always take forever to write a post because I want it to be absolutely perfect. However, with these post, I’ve managed to write exactly what I wanted and not fiddle with it as much. I hope that’s a trend that will continue to happen.
  • Learning that the themes that I’m interested in writing about stemmed from my favorites in childhood literature. Names and wit are extremely important to me.
  • Sharing with all of you!
  • Being able to commiserate together while BEA was going on.

I’m glad for the much needed sleep. Thank you to everyone who visited my blog and commented. You do not know much much I appreciate it. They really make me smile. If you enjoy my posts, please follow me on Bloglovin. :D

Check out my previous post in Armchair BEA:





June 1, 2013 • Cee • Events

armchairbea21

Today’s topic is about children’s literature! The genre that we’ve been waiting for.

Children’s literature is important. I hadn’t realize how much of an impact it had on me until after I finished writing this post. I don’t read a lot of children’s literature anymore so I couldn’t tell you which ones are my favorite. At least, for the ones that have been recently released. I don’t follow that. I do have two favorite childhood series – one is full of picture and short, the other is full of words and tragedy.

Kevin Henkes

For those who do not know who Kevin Henkes is, he wrote and illustrated the Mouse Books series and Kitten’s First Full Moon (which won him the Caldecott Medal). When I was a child, this picture book was my absolute favorite:

kevin henkes - chrysanthemum

Chrysanthemum.

I am fond of this book. It’s about a mouse named Chrysanthemum who is teased by her classmate because her name is unusual. You can imagine how Chrysanthemum reacts – nobody likes to be teased, especially because of a name. The book deals with bullying and personal identity. I adored the pictures and the color scheme. Despite a couple of problems I have now, I thought it was a cute and lovely book.

Thinking about this book makes me nostalgic. When I was younger, I disliked my name. Kids teased me, but not to the extent that I cried about it when I returned home. I feel that most kids go through that stage where they dislike their names and want a new one. Seeing Chrysanthemum come to terms with her name helped me realize that I don’t want a boring name that every kid have. And I think that may have began my interest in names and meanings (which deeply influenced the stories I had written in workshop).

Lemony Snicket

Lemony Snicket holds a special place in my heart because of this series of books:

I loved A Series of Unfortunate Events and was completely invested in the lives of the Baudelaire orphans and the Quagmire triplets. It’s a fairly dark tale, especially for children. I remember reading these books and wanted something good to happen for the Baudelaire orphans, but when it did, you just know Lemony Snicket will taketh it away. 

I know that some people are completely put off by the writing style, but I am not one of them! I find it extremely charming. I feel like it’s Daniel Handler (Lemony Snicket is his pseudonym) is making fun of this guy who writes nothing but horrible things to  children. Almost like satire on gothic theme.

I remember being in awe and envious when one of my classmates in elementary school had gotten an early copy of the newly released books. My heart pounded for the Baudelaire orphans, worried about how the Baudelaire orphans would escape from Count Olaf’s grasp. I was obsessed.

The Impact!

After I wrote this post, I realized, surprisingly, that the stories I create are influenced by these two books. Chrysanthemum started my interest in the naming and the importance of it. Every time I write a story, I always try to find a name that has a specific meaning because I like to see how their actions/attitudes are representative or atypical of their names. A Series of Unfortunate Events started my love for satire (making fun of people/things), wordplay, and the silly tragedies that seem utterly absurd. I feel a bit in awe that this post made me realize that even as a kid, I was interested in these type of themes. And it carried on to adulthood. Wow. 

What books did you read when you were little? What were your favorites? Did they leave a big impression on you?

Check out my previous post in Armchair BEA:





May 31, 2013 • Cee • Events

armchairbea21

Today’s topic is about non-fiction!

I don’t read a lot of non-fiction regularly. However, as someone who minored in history minor, I had to read my share of non-fiction works. I’m far more interested in reading about people than the history of a country. I feel like I’m more interested in reading about people than the history of a country.

Fabulous people! 

Like I said earlier, I’m interested in reading about people – specifically the Lost Generation folks and the Bright Young People. I find these group of people extremely interesting and fabulous. I’m a big fan of the early 21st century  – 1920/30s are my favorite time period. I envy their lifestyles (which included partying and being oh-so-tragic). It’s just so interesting to me. For those who don’t know who these group of people are, the Lost Generation included infamous writers like Hemingway and the Fitzgeralds. Bright Young People were bored rich people in Britain who threw lavish parties despite ongoing problems in the world. Any books about that are set in that time period – give them to me! 

I have four books on my table that I have yet to read, but I am dying to! 

What are non-fiction books that catches your eye?

Check out my previous post in Armchair BEA:





May 31, 2013 • Cee • Events

armchairbea21

Today’s topic is about ethics! Juicy one! I’m gonna try to keep it relatively short.

Plagiarism + Credit!

Plagiarism sucks. I haven’t experienced plagiarism, but it is a big no-no, especially for me – a former English major who was taught that plagiarism will earn them an F on the paper and possible academic probation. It’s something I was always afraid of happening. Copying somebody’s written work is obviously not okay. If you’re copying somebody’s work word by word, there is something deeply wrong with you. Why would you even do that? What purpose does that serve? Just STOP. You should let your words speak for yourself. It’s your words we, as readers, are interested in. That type of plagiarism is obvious to spot. 

What about plagiarizing ideas? Now that is a bit difficult to identify. I think we all fear that we may have unintentional plagiarize an idea (maybe for a meme or a discussion post that uses the same arguments as another person). The important thing is being self-aware. If you find out that your idea sounds like a similar one (but you didn’t intentional plagiarize them), you can address it. Whenever I wrote essays, I constantly worried that I was writing about something somebody had already written a paper  on. Let’s be honest, you can’t have a truly original idea. You can put your own spin to it, but give credit when necessary. If you are inspired by an idea from a fellow blogger/writer/artist, credit them.

Always credit when you take ideas/pictures/gifs/quotes. It’s not difficult. I understand that you may sometimes forget to credit the person who made the gif or picture. (I know it slips my mind when I take gifs.) BUT it’s one of those situations where you learn from the mistake. I always make sure I credit every image I take. Just credit people. It’ll give you a peace of mind.

Be specific! 

When I read reviews, I like knowing where bloggers get your books from – bought, won, borrowed, whatever it is. I feel like knowing where they get it brings a level of honesty. I’ll know that they aren’t stealing the books for their own entertainment. If the book is an ARC, say so. As well as specifics, be honest. 

Be respectful!

Respect people’s opinions. In reviews, not everybody will enjoy or like a book you did. They have good reasons why they didn’t like it, and hopefully, they provided the reasons why. People having differing opinions can lead to a healthy discussion. When I read a review I disagree with, I do feel defensive about the book that I liked, but I don’t jump down the writer’s throat. You want to treat them the way you want to be treated. You wouldn’t want a person to suddenly attack your opinions just because they didn’t agree with them, right?

A blogger having a bad review isn’t horrible. To me, having a balance of good and bad reviews show that the person is trustworthy. They aren’t rating these books because they’re getting paid by said author or are trying to boost the author’s ratings. I can really rely on their opinions (even if I don’t agree with them).

Well, I did not keep my word that this was going to be short. Whoops?

What are your codes of ethics when it comes to blogging or writing reviews?

Check out my previous post in Armchair BEA: